我想拥有一个玉兰牧场

温室小玛茄
楼主 (北美华人网)
温室小玛茄

拥有一个这样的venue是我的梦想
hzhzhzgmai
理想是丰满的,现实是骨感的!我家花园里的杂草,我不用杀草剂,我都搞不定
Dina029
祝你早日梦想成真
温室小玛茄
回复 3楼hzhzhzgmai的帖子
农场杂草太多了~ 只要把主要居住/仪式/宾客那块整理出来了,其他不影响的。我之前呆了好几个做wedding venue的场地都这样的。。 我同事在农场拍婚纱照还见到过蛇。。。
温室小玛茄
这个Farm可不是靠种植农作物挣钱的。。,不会有人不知道Joanna Gaines 吧
温室小玛茄

。。。。。。。。
Shanzhu
我的梦想也是有一个农场,种有机的蔬菜,谷物。。。。。。。。。。怎么实现呢?
xinchina
回复 8楼Shanzhu的帖子
你自己种,还是承包给别人种呢
温室小玛茄
回复 9楼xinchina的帖子
大规模种菜除非自己真的懂 不然累还赚不到钱
Shanzhu
回复 8楼Shanzhu的帖子
你自己种,还是承包给别人种呢
xinchina 发表于 2021-06-10 22:03

都可以啊,可是没钱没经验的。。。只能说是梦想了吧
Shanzhu

我的理想是有一个这样的有机生态农场
温室小玛茄
农场赚钱只有开发和旅游沾边的 不然又苦又习惯不了钱
温室小玛茄

马克 34 Acres
Lot, Irregular, Landscaped, Lrg. Backyard Grass, Pasture, Some Trees, Tank/ PondExterior Buildings: tenant house, workshopBarn Information: barn(s), equipment barn, hay barn, stable(s), tack roomProposed Use: agriculture, Cattle, dairy, equine, hunting/fishing, Mixed Use, residential singleFrontage Feet: 1888Road Frontage: Asphalt, CountyAcres Pasture: 32.00Restrictions: no known restriction(s)Development: Streets Installed, Utilities InstalledEasements: utilitiesFencing: Barbed WireTopography: Cleared, level, rolling, variedSoil Type: Sandy LoamNumber of Lakes: 1Crops: nativeZoning: Not ZonedWill Subdivide: yes
Shanzhu
回复 14楼温室小玛茄的帖子
真是一片好地,没有太多树,中间还有水塘
温室小玛茄
回复 15楼Shanzhu的帖子
是啊,就是有点过大。我觉得我想要的大概10亩地就够了。
温室小玛茄

系统提示:若遇到视频无法播放请点击下方链接
https://www.youtube.com/embed/qOZykOhQejw
灵感之一
温室小玛茄

系统提示:若遇到视频无法播放请点击下方链接
https://www.youtube.com/embed/TzChs3a0CjI 灵感之二
温室小玛茄
BRRRR
Breaking Down the BRRRR Method
When you buy a property, fix it up, improve its value, and then refinance, you’re borrowing against the value of the property at its highest. Done correctly, this allows you to recover more of—or sometimes all of—the money you invested in the property.
Here’s what you need to know.
1. Buy
They say you make your money when you buy, and that’s definitely true. But to paraphrase Tolstoy’s opening line to Anna Karenina, all good deals involve a good purchase, but each bad deal is bad in its own way.
Most lenders will finance 75 percent of a property’s value, so holders should aim for 75 percent all-in. And we generally do because we have some money we can leave in the deals and are prioritizing volume. If that doesn’t describe you, I would argue you should stick with the 70 percent guideline for two reasons:
Refinancing costs money. Most banks charge a point and there will be an appraisal, title work, and loan processing fees that eat away at your margin. Aiming for 75 percent offers no contingency. People go over budget more often than under budget so building in a bit more of a margin is a better idea unless you are going for volume.
A number of options can help you purchase your BRRRR property, such as cash, a hard money loan, seller financing, or a private loan. Deciding which upfront financing to use is outside this article’s scope, but what’s important to note here is that different upfront financing options will result in different acquisition and holding costs. You need to account for those when analyzing a deal in order to hit your 70 or 75 percent goal.
So what's the key to BRRRR success? Buying properties under market value and never investing more than 75 percent of the property's after repair value (ARV). This ensures you never run out of capital and can continue buying forever.
Let's start with your ARV. I recommend having a trusted source like an experienced agent, lender, or other investor give you a conservative number they believe the house will appraise for once it's been repaired the way you intend. Take that number and multiply it by .75. This is your "target." Your goal is to get the rehab and the purchase price to add up to this target goal.
If you pay too much for a property, there is very little you can do to recover from surprises and problems.
2. Rehab There are two key questions to keep in mind when rehabbing a rental:
What do I need to do to make this house livable and functional? Which rehab decisions can I make that will add more value than their cost?
If you rehab correctly and make sure you add value when you do, you are pretty much guaranteed to recover your money—and then some. However, unless you buy and hold luxury rentals, generally speaking, these things aren't necessary:
Granite countertops Brazilian hardwood floors High-end stainless steel appliances Bay windows Skylights Hot tubs Chandeliers
It’s also rarely worth finishing a basement or a garage for a rental. Instead, consider changes like two-tone paint, refinished hardwoods, and new tile.
And, of course, the house needs to be in good shape. Everything needs to be functional. Being a slumlord will hurt you in the long run—and our industry’s reputation. 
Of course, your new purchase won’t be in good shape when you purchase it. That’s the point! I intentionally look for properties that need massive repairs because I know other investors will ignore them, and the sellers will be more motivated to drop their prices.
Some of the best problems to look for are:
Roofs: If you add a new roof, appraisers tend to give you back the money you spent in property value. Unfinished kitchen: An outdated kitchen is ugly but still usable. A partially demoed kitchen makes a house ineligible for financing and therefore much easier to buy with cash. Drywall damage: Drywall damage makes a property ineligible for financing while also scaring away the majority of home buyers. The good news? Drywall isn’t super expensive to repair. Horrific landscaping: Overgrown vegetation frightens the competition but costs very little to repair. You don’t need a skilled landscaper to hack down overgrown landscaping, so a few hundred dollars will take you further than you think. Outdated bathrooms: I routinely completely remodel bathrooms for $3,000 to $5,000. Most bathrooms aren’t very big, so the material and labor costs come in low. This allows your house to compare to much nicer homes in the neighborhood with higher ARVs. Too few bedrooms: Homes with more than 1,200 square feet but less than three bedrooms offer easy ways to add value. Adding a third or fourth bedroom helps it compare to much more expensive properties, increasing your ARV. By targeting properties like these and making repairs at below market value, you can add big equity to your deals.
3. Rent Banks rarely want to refinance a property that isn’t occupied, so renting comes first. It’s critical to screen diligently so you get tenants that will pay each month. But it’s also important on the financing side. While appraisers shouldn’t take too much into account about how clean and pleasant the tenant is, everyone is human. First impressions make a difference.
You need to notify the tenant before an appraisal. I always recommend you request interior appraisals versus drive-bys: Appraisers are more cautious and may downgrade your property unfairly with drive-bys. Send out or post a note on your tenant’s door about the date and time and give a reminder call the day before, unless your local laws require something else. Tenants don’t need to be present, but you should ask them to clean up and kennel any pets if they won’t be home.
One thing to keep in mind with the BRRRR strategy: Your mortgage will typically be slightly higher than with the traditional method because you are borrowing more money against the house. This is well worth it. Capital in the bank can be used to grow wealth, while equity in a property can't be used for much. The flip side of this argument is that your cash flow will be slightly lower with the higher mortgage payment.
This just means you have to be that much more careful when it comes to running rental comps and knowing what you can expect for rent once you purchase your property.
4. Refinance Not too long ago, it was extremely hard to find a bank that was willing to refinance single-family rental properties. Now it is much easier. Still, when looking for such banks, there are a few things that you will need to ask:
Do they offer cash out or will they only pay off debt? If they won’t offer cash out, move on. What seasoning period do they require? A “seasoning period” is how long you have to own a property before the bank will lend on the appraised value instead of how much you’ve invested. For the BRRRR strategy to work, you must borrow on the appraised value. These days, some banks are willing to lend on the appraised value as soon as a property has been rehabbed and rented. These are the best banks to find.
To find great BRRRR banks, ask around. Ask investors you know, or query our BiggerPockets Forum users. A bank already lending to another investor will likely lend to you, too.
Here’s another unique way to find such banks. Go to a website such as ListSource or CoreLogic and search for every loan made in your city and price range in the last year to non-owner occupants. This search will probably cost a couple hundred dollars.
Right off the bat, you know these banks lend to investors at the price point you require. They’ve done it before, so there is a good chance they will do it again.
Provide the lender with thorough, clear information. This impresses them—remember, these are human beings, not computers—and helps them decide quickly.
The trick to being successful here is getting as high of an appraised value as you possibly can. A big part of success in this area is a combination of how well you rehabbed your property and how strong your initial comps were.
Sinking a lot of capital into a deal and then failing to pull it out is a big problem. I recommend getting pre-approved for a loan before buying.
5. Repeat
The “repeat” part of the BRRRR cycle is the most fun. Take everything you learned, gained, and improved upon and put it back into action.
Work on building systems, too. Systems help you accomplish your objectives by repeating the same process, over and over. Systems cut down on mistakes and stress. The more documented your systems are, the less you'll worry about something being missed, overseen, or forgotten about.
Source: https://www.biggerpockets.com/guides/brrrr-method
温室小玛茄
The ARV formula that the appraiser will use is quite simple. They use the purchase price and then they add the added value as previously described. (Purchase Price) + (Value From Renovations) = After Repair Value The 70% Rule
The 70% rule is a guideline in the real estate investing business that states no bid price at the beginning of a project should exceed 70% of the ARV minus estimated repair costs. (ARV x 70%) – Estimated Repairs = Maximum Purchase Target
This is a rule of thumb that real estate investors should follow which will allow them to make a 30% return on their investment (ROI). Rehab Financial uses a rule of 70% when it comes to lending on a project. Once RFG receives the ARV from the appraiser, we calculate 70% to determine the maximum that we are willing to lend.
After Repair Value x 70% = Maximum Loan Amount
p
peekston
The ARV formula that the appraiser will use is quite simple. They use the purchase price and then they add the added value as previously described. (Purchase Price) + (Value From Renovations) = After Repair Value The 70% Rule
The 70% rule is a guideline in the real estate investing business that states no bid price at the beginning of a project should exceed 70% of the ARV minus estimated repair costs. (ARV x 70%) – Estimated Repairs = Maximum Purchase Target
This is a rule of thumb that real estate investors should follow which will allow them to make a 30% return on their investment (ROI). Rehab Financial uses a rule of 70% when it comes to lending on a project. Once RFG receives the ARV from the appraiser, we calculate 70% to determine the maximum that we are willing to lend.
After Repair Value x 70% = Maximum Loan Amount

温室小玛茄 发表于 2021-06-17 00:42

这个方法很好的。我积累的很多房子是这样,放进去的现金很少。 比如14万现金买,cash out refinancing for 12万,现在市价27万,租金$1450, ,15年的贷款,也就3、4年的功夫,积累了不少EQUITY。 还有25万现金,花个3万左右修理,贷款24万,市值大盖45万。只是每个月差不多租金和贷款持平,因为靠近市区价格太贵。 等等。。
whatawonderful
回复 3楼hzhzhzgmai的帖子
哈哈,很搞笑嘛:)
whatawonderful
回复 16楼温室小玛茄的帖子
不大,种竹子吧,以后可以考虑竹品加工:)